Latest News

NEW GRANT AVAILABLE TO HELP WAIKATO-TAINUI TRIBAL MEMBERS GAIN DRIVER LICENSE
29 March 2017

Kia Haere Tuu translates to “Be Alert” and derives from a well-known kiwaha of Princess Te Puea – “kia maaori ai te haere atu, kia maaori ai te hokinga mai” which refers to ensuring that our people who travel, return home safely.

The Driver Licence Grant is a collaborative initiative supported by Waikato-Tainui, Te Puni Kokiri, Mercury Energy and New Zealand Transport Agency.

The Grant offers registered Waikato-Tainui tribal members a 50% discount off the FULL cost of a Class 1 Car learners, restricted or full licence.

It also offers at least a 60% discount off the cost to attend a Street Talk Defensive Driving Course (normally $180-$215).

Driver licence fees were identified as a major barrier preventing tribal members applying for a licence and or delaying them moving to the next licence stage. A significant proportion of fatal crashes involved learner or inexperienced drivers.

The standards for driver licence testing in New Zealand have also increased, and as such, driver testing now involves a range of driver safety and practical driving skills hence the development of Kia Haere Tuu.

GET MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE DRIVER LICENSING DISCOUNT HERE.

GET MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE STREET TALK DEFENSIVE DRIVING COURSE HERE.


Not sure where to start? Check out the Q&A’s or email drive@tainui.co.nz.

 

NEW CULTURAL WETLAND HANDBOOK RELEASED
10 February 2017

Te Reo o Te Repo

Te Reo o Te Repo – the Voice of the Wetland

Te Reo o Te Repo – the Voice of the Wetland is an online wetland handbook developed by Waikato-Tainui and Manaaki Whenua-Landcare Research, which highlights the mahi (work) undertaken by iwi and hapuu to increase the health and wellbeing of their repo (wetlands).

Funded mainly by the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) Wetland Restoration Programme, the handbook includes processes for facilitating renewed and vibrant connections between whānau and their resources and understanding cultural resources.

It also aims to provide learning from case studies on wetland restoration, cultural indicators, and monitoring, all led by or in collaboration with tangata whenua.

Written by Maaori researchers, as well as scientists who have worked closely with iwi partners, a key drive of the handbook is to provide best practice techniques for the enhancement and protection of cultural wetland values.

It will also help assist local authorities, research providers, and community groups in their understanding of cultural priorities for wetland restoration.

To find out more, click on the link here:Te Reo o Te Repo – the Voice of the Wetland
 
 
 

NATIVE FISH FACT SHEET LAUNCHED
10 February 2016

NZ Landcare Trust has developed a series of resources that focus on New Zealand’s unique freshwater fish and highlights the factors that impact on their survival.

Hooked On Native Fish Fact Sheets

Hooked On Native Fish Fact Sheets

The “Hooked on Native Fish” fact sheets were supported by the Waikato Raupatu River Trust in securing funding from Ma Te Reo to have the resource translated into Te Reo Maaori.

The translation work was undertaken by language expert Pania Papa (Ngaati Koroki-Kahukura).

“Community groups and iwi,hapu, marae are playing an increasingly important role in the restoration of freshwater habitats for native fish,” said Waikato-Tainui Environment Manager Tim Manukau.

“Resources such as these fact sheets provide valuable information that increases understanding of the various issues impacting on our native fish along with providing a range of helpful solutions.

Our kura kaupapa and kohanga reo are using the fact sheets.”

The series of six fact sheets consists of the following:

  • Our Freshwater Fish
  • Stream Works for Fish
  • Fixing Your Stream Edges
  • Native Fish in the City
  • Native Fish on the Farm
  • Caring For Our Catchments

To find out more, click on the link here: http://www.landcare.org.nz/Regional-Focus/Hamilton-Office/Hooked-On-Native-Fish/Fish-Fact-Sheets1